The dee in Dundee

The dee in Dundee is to donder,

doon disappearing lines ta discover.

Dinnae greet, nae awthing dreich!

Tough is oor fabric, nae jam but traffic.

Streets fu o’ signs… in oor time,

hae a wee look, fae trams ta drams

and dae the dee… in donder.

copyright © Olsen 2016

End All Edges

Trespass traps thorny threat

Protect prevention

Partition Partition!

Risk restriction

Limits

Intrude infringe invade

Danger deterrents defend divide

Mark menace maintain

Hide high hedges

End edges

Guard

Border barricades

Shields shelter spikes spears spines scratch score

copyright © Olsen 2016

Interconnected

Interconnecteds
copyright © Olsen 2016

Interconnected and living within complex thinking.

A life of dynamic systems,

filtering an advanced migration of monitored surveillance.

The psych of the universe governing over our world.

Traps for Trespassers

anti-climbsANTI-CLIMB copyright © Olsen 2016

Walking the streets of Dundee, in search for details, I have noticed the lengths people go to in protecting their property from unwanted guests. These deterrents – high walls, thorny hedges and spikes – are a potential cause of injury to unwanted guests. In 1926, Lord Justice Scrutton argued;

“The general principle is that he who enters wrongly enters at his own risk.”

Historically, people have been known to put broken glass along the tops of walls, or use barbed wire fences. This would provide a very inconvenient time for a trespasser who would incur injury from cuts and scratches. The trespasser had no right to complain as a person had a right to defend of their property!”

Time and Law has moved on, occupiers have a duty of care for the safety of visitors using their premises and this extends to some responsibility to protect intruders, including trespassers! However it may be possible to dismiss this duty of care with a sign, warning people about the danger.